Primary Tassie Objective Achieved

The main reason for visiting Tasmania at this time of year (early) was in the hope of photographing a rare endemic Archipetalia auriculata (Tasmanian Redspot). With only about ten public records available I thought it was never going to be easy. I thought they might like cascading waterfalls, like their closest relatives Austropetalia tonyana from Victoria. However a recent sighting in the south of the state by Elaine McDonald changed my mind as she found them near montane trickles in the Hartz Mountains. With this in mind my plan was to explore Cradle Mountain near some historic records and then the buttongrass plains near Savage River where I had found the uncommon Synthemiopsis gomphomacromioides (Tasmanian Spotwing) in February 2017. And I only had two days as the weather was going to turn Tasmanian.

Day One in Cradle Mountain provided fine weather but very few insects (and no dragonflies at all). Day Two still had fine weather but it was very windy (i.e. average for Tasmania's north-west). I started checking some of the swampy areas where I had found Synthemiopsis gomphomacromioides but without success until I visited a trickle flowing from a boggy flat. That's where I found Archipetalia auriculata! At first I thought I had even photographed a female (there are no in situ photos of females) but it turns out their anal appendages are not very significant — doesn't seem to bother them though. :) At this first site there were two males and then a little down the road I photographed another male. I'm thinking perhaps it was too late already for the females (the family all emerge early in the season, typically during October).

So now I will search some more for females when the weather gets better but its unlikely I will even get to the Hartz Mountains (I no longer need to) as there won't be enough fine days left during this trip.

Lähettänyt reiner reiner, 22. marraskuuta 2018 04:14

Havainnot

Kuvat / Äänet

Havainnoija

reiner

Päivämäärä

Marraskuu 19, 2018 02:23 PM AEDT

Kuvaus

This is what I went to Tasmania for!

Kuvat / Äänet

Havainnoija

reiner

Päivämäärä

Marraskuu 19, 2018 03:23 PM AEDT

Kommentit

Thumb

Well done Reiner - fantastic achievement and great detective work!

Lähettänyt blawson noin 2 vuotta sitten (Lippu)
Thumb

Hello Reiner,
as your family name is "Richter" i do assume you got german speaking ancestors, either from Germany, or perhaps Austria.
Just a suggestion to your journal concerning Tasmania expedition, could you please add links to mentioned taxa at iNaturalist, so it was easier for non-experts like me to find info about?
2nd request of personal interest: As i am hooked on genus Polystichum (as well, not exclusively at all!), i liked to try breeding your native P. proliferum from spores, but how to get viable ones? So is there a chance to send spores of this pretty fern when these are maturing?
I got to refind the link to Anne Sleep's remarkable thesis treating several species, natural and artificial hybrids, in order to clear relations and hybridogenous speciation within the genus. Anne produced several hybrids of Mother shield fern with distantly related species of other continents, which in general may be propagated by inherited proliferous plantlets. So far, the sole rarely traded hybrid is https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/481689-Polystichum-×-dycei so named P. braunii × proliferum.
I will add the link to Anne's thesis, downloadable as pdf later on, in case you were not quicker than me.
Best regards
Erwin (in current cold and rainy Styria, Austria)

Lähettänyt erwin_pteridophilos noin 2 vuotta sitten (Lippu)
Thumb
Lähettänyt erwin_pteridophilos noin 2 vuotta sitten (Lippu)

Lisää kommentti

Kirjaudu sisään tai Rekisteröidy lisätäksesi kommentteja